Triggers and the Hangover

Most people know what a hangover feels like: headaches, dizziness, sickness, a sense of a hazy existence. Some claim to have their personal “cures”- mine happens to be complaining to the wife and hating the world around me.

Although, traditional ‘morning after night’ hangover is different in symptoms of psychiatric discontent, in my experience there is little different in the body’s response to a long night out.

I’m speaking specifically about complex post – traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD), because this is what I know, but I’m sure this is something people who live in all sorts of conditions of mental health experience.   I heard before that the word “adrenaline hangover” and I understand that there is something similar here. 

An adrenaline hangover is often experienced after you have produced a fight or a flight response — a panic attack, a trigger, an “episode,” extreme stress, etc. It is like you are someone who has severe anxiety and spends the day doing something emotionally tiring or hard for you, and then you experience reservoir-like symptoms afterwards. I think that a C-PTSD hangover is at least somewhat different for me. Doing something that makes me anxious is quite different from experiencing a C-PTSD trigger response.

Often, I can get in touch with a trigger, heal easily, and be OK within a few minutes, and sometimes it can affect me for days. It’s sometimes just a reaction, a physical and emotional response, and then a recovery, but often a reaction, a response, and then a feeling that some sort that positivity has been drained out of you for days to come. I have known it to last weeks.

It’s a constant reminder of your pain, and it leaves you in a state of everything your body does to respond to it, which can make it very hard to get back to your day-to-day life when you’ve undergone a stimulus.

The Importance of Self-Care

People all have different requirements for self-care, but in general, the goals of self-care are to find a state of good mental and physical health, reduce stress, meet emotional needs, maintain one’s  relationships, both romantic and platonic, and find a balance between one’s personal and academic or professional relationships.

Meeting one’s own needs tends to make a person more able to help and support others and, generally speaking, to obtain more happiness, and fulfillment from life. In order to facilitate your own healthy routine to make sure your needs are met, it can be helpful to develop a self – care plan centered on :

  • Physical Self
  • Mental Self
  • Spiritual Self
Self-Care Motivation
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